Honda to expand two wheeler R&D in India, engine development will remain in Japan – Report

Posted on: Nov 4, 2015 - 3:42pm IST

India is Honda’s No. 2 market in the world.

In a recent interview with Economic Times, Shinji Aoyama, Honda Motor Company’s Chief Operating Officer for Motorcycle Operations since April 2013, revealed that the local R&D of two wheelers in India will be promoted while the engine development will be retained in Japan. He served as the President of Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India Pvt. Ltd. from June 2007 to March 2011.

Honda Activa 3G headlamp at the launch
Shinji Aoyama says that HMSI has a competitive edge over Hero MotoCorp when it comes to local development of vehicles.

He commented that HMSI’s chief rival, Hero MotoCorp, is still wondering how to improve capability or development of a product on their own, while Honda has already started developing two wheelers locally, in Manesar.

Aoyama went on to say that HMSI can develop a two wheeler from scratch, but the development of an engine is not easy enough to be entrusted to the Indian wing. He added that the Indian R&D team is still new, and that he is not sure if India can be given the responsibility to develop products for markets like Africa and the Middle East, as China is more competitive in terms of cost.

2015 Honda Aviator 2015 Honda Activa i press image
Shinji Aoyama thinks Honda India should cater to youngsters’ demands alongside chasing volumes.

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Shinji Aoyama also mentioned that HMSI should focus on meeting the current youngsters’ demands in parallel to chasing volumes. In two to three years, Honda India has a chance to overtake Indonesia’s sales volume to become the No.1 market for the brand in the world.

Honda Activa 3G – Image Gallery (Unrelated)

[Source: Economic Times]

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Ashwin Ram
Ashwin Ram N P

Ashwin is a guy with a slightly unorthodox perception of everything. His struggle to choose a career path, between art and automotive engineering, has landed him in the field of auto journalism, where he has paved way for himself to practise both.