Spied – Three different variants of Royal Enfield Continental GT spotted

Posted on: Jul 10, 2013 - 10:29am IST

The Royal Enfield Continental GT, a retro cafe racer has started being in the news quite frequently.

Royal Enfield Continental GT cafe racer with three seating configurations
The motorcycle in the middle sports an hitherto unseen seating configuration with body colored element instead of pillion seat.

A Facebook group named “Royal Enfield” has uploaded an image which reveals three Continental GT’s with different seating layouts. This suggests that RE is evaluating three variants of the bike but it remains to be seen whether all will make it to the market.

The Continental GT grabs attention with its old school charm and a ready-to-go-racing character. The aggressive riding posture distinguishes it from the rest of its stablemates. It’s not built for comfortable cruising, its built for racing!

The motorcycle will be powered by a 535cc single cylinder, four stroke, liquid cooled UCE engine. The performance stats are not available yet but the cafe racer will be the fastest and the lightest RE in the current lineup. Expect the bike to have a top speed in the vicinity of 160kph.

Coming back to the spyshot, out of the three different seating arrangements, two are single seat layouts while one allows a pillion rider. We reckon the standard variant would come with pillion seat while the single seat layouts would be optional. Another interesting detail that emphasizes the bike’s racing intention is the adjustable rider foot pegs.

The Royal Enfield Continental GT will be made at the company’s new plant in Oragadam. The bike will be launched by the end of this year.

[Image credit: Facebook Group page of Royal Enfield]

Next would you like to read more about the or more about Royal Enfield, Spy pictures?

2 thoughts on “Spied – Three different variants of Royal Enfield Continental GT spotted

  1. Arki says:

    We want chrome exhaust 🙁

    Reply
  2. The Continental GT’s top speed will be about 140 Kph. For 160 Kph, more extensive changes to the engine and gearing are required than just an over-bore and remap.

    Cheers,

    Jay

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

About the Author
Nithyanandh
Nithyanandh K

As a toddler, those wheeled machinery fascinated me even before I knew what they’re called as! So here I'm, petrolhead by birth, Mechanical engineer by qualification and automotive reporter by profession!